Stephanie Dimiskovski

 

This weeks 'Framed' contributor is Stephanie Dimiskovski, a freelance photographer and student. Stephanie shares her words regarding her internal challenges as a creative. We hope you enjoy Stephanie's encouraging words and distinctive images.

Stephanie:

I am Stephanie Dimiskovski, a 22-year-old photographer from New Jersey. In just a few months, I will be graduating from Rutgers University with a BFA in Visual Arts and Photography and ready to move out into the world. I’ll be ready to work my butt off doing what I love, and I’ll be ready to spend the rest of my life with my guy. To be honest, I’ve been ready; at least I’d like to think that I have.
 
My appeal for photography started when I was 16 years old. And since then, taking photographs has been an outlet for all the things that I find beautiful in my life. I hate to be a cornball, but for me, that’s what it comes down to. My goal, consciously and subconsciously, has always been to somehow share the quiet moments that often pass us. I believe that these are small moments that I’ve picked up throughout my childhood and my young adulthood. I want to show people how I see this world, and hopefully make them feel what I feel.
 
I find myself yearning for quick results in almost everything I do, causing me to become eager, excited, and anxious. However, I know that I shouldn’t be impulsive; something almost always tells me to stop, slow down and think. I am especially this way with my work. I want to make something better than I did before, because there is always room for improvement.
 
I’m not entirely sure why I’ve been led to take photographs, but I’m slowly learning more about myself as a result of it. Being patient with myself is a constant struggle. But when I finally relax and give myself room to breath, I am at my most creative. I have to remind myself that I don’t have to control every detail, and that everything will work itself out. In this mindset, I think it is essential to study the work of other artists as much as you can. I find that looking at other work helps to spark new ideas and inspirations. However, it’s even more essential to look back at yourself, study what you are doing and why you are doing it. Be confident in yourself and know yourself. No one can tell you what you want to say better than you can.


Stephanie Dimiskovski

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